Survey: Marketers missing the mark with U.S. consumers

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Survey: Marketers missing the mark with U.S. consumers

By Dan Berthiaume - 02/22/2019
Brands have some fine-tuning to do with their U.S. consumer marketing efforts, according to a new survey.

“Closing the CX Gap: Customer Experience Trends Report 2019,” a survey by Acquia of consumers and marketers across North America, Europe and Australia, uncovered significant disconnects between brands and the U.S. consumers they market to. Survey respondents include 1,000 U.S. consumers and 100 U.S. marketers.

For example, 78% of U.S. consumers said they do not think brands should be able to use their personal data to market different things to them, and 56% are not confident that brands have their best interests in mind when they use, share and/or store their personal data.

In addition to concerns over privacy, U.S. consumers also have concerns about their customer experience. Fifty-six percent of U.S. consumers feel that in their total experience with most brands, marketing is mostly ineffective. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. consumers (63%) feel that brands interact with them the right amount, which according to Acquia analysis means the quality, not quantity, of interaction is the major issue.

On the brand side, results demonstrate a lack of confidence in current marketing technology. Nearly seven of 10 of all U.S. marketers (69%) believe technology has made it harder, not easier, for them to offer customers personalized experiences. Eighty percent of U.S. marketers feel their customers want higher levels of personalization than they can currently offer.

Despite these issues, U.S. consumers demonstrate loyalty to brands that manage to win their trust. Three-quarters of U.S. consumers agree that if a brand understands them at a personal level, they are more likely to be loyal. Moreover, 59% of U.S. consumers – the highest of all countries surveyed – reported that once they are loyal to a brand, the brand has their loyalty for life. U.S. consumers also were the least likely to move on from a brand they are loyal to after having a bad experience.